hide

Read Next

Negotiating in Vietnam is a strange, strange thing

First off, quick refresher - what is negotiation?

Good negotiation is about discovering things you value a low amount that the other party values a high amount, finding things they value a low amount that you value highly, and exchanging. I wrote about this in "How to Avoid Exchange-Based Relationships" -

A lot of people don’t understand good negotiating. They think it’s about getting the best price – no, no, no. Good negotiation is about figuring out what you can offer that’s worth more to the other person than you, and what they can offer that’s worth more to you than them.

However...

it’s okay to have pure exchanges sometimes, like if you’re just buying something once. But if you can transcend that, move it beyond the exchange and into looking out for each other, that can be a beautiful thing.

The Money Game

On Imported Blog

It’s vacation time! Your plane tickets have been purchased, bags packed and the camera fully charged. There’s just one thing left to handle before you embark on your adventure…money. Figuring out how to get and spend money when it’s in U.S. dollars is easy, but figuring out money issues in a foreign country can be a challenge even for experienced travelers. Here are a few dos and don’ts to make exchanging foreign currency as simple as 1, 2, 3!

Do: Know The Country’s Currency And Exchange Rate

Sometimes we get so caught up in the excitement of planning that we forget about what we’ll need when we get there. Make sure you know the local currency for the country you’ll be visiting and check the exchange rates before you go. Checking out sites like xe.com will help you find the most accurate foreign exchange rates around and give you an idea of how much or how little spending money you will need in order to plan better and avoid over spending.

Knowing a country’s currency and exchange rate is also good during the planning stages of a trip and can help you decide which countries will give you the most bang for your travel buck. For example, Europe is an extremely popular travel destination, but the exchange rate for most countries, especially those using Euros, is not budget friendly. One U.S. dollar equals 0.752688 Euros which means you actually lose money in the conversion. In contrast, Asian countries like Japan or Thailand give you more for the U.S. dollar with one dollar equaling 82.8929 Yen and 30.8189 Baht, respectively.

Don’t: Use Currency Exchange Companies

Rendering New Theme...